With surf spots along all of the south, east and west coasts, finding the ultimate break isn't a problem, and considering most of the surfing population is anchored to metro areas, it's not too difficult to find an empty break if you are willing to travel.

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Victoria

Bells Beach on Victoria’s Surf Coast would have to be the spiritual home of surfing in Australia. When it’s pumping, this iconic location attracts massive crowds who eagerly watch the local pros take on moving-mountains of 5m+. However if you just to Winki, only 100m north along the high-cliff coastline where, when the swell is running, you will be rewarded with faster, steeper and more barrelling waves.

You can also head to state's first National Surfing Reserve at Phillip Island, which includes breaks like Woolamai and Magic Lands (it also includes a fair few great white sharks, as a result of the local fur seal population).

Western Australia

If you head 260km south of Perth, you'll arrive at the gateway to Margaret River, which is also known just equally for its proliferation of wineries and surf breaks. Here you'll find breaks that vary from standard fun fare through to full water-walls only designed for the fearless. For the most serious surf, head further south to Prevelly Park and prepare yourself for swells in excess of 6m providing perfect barrels across an offshore reef. Also not a place for beginners is the famous Boneyards, which is considered the 'the best winter break for those crazy enough to take it on'. Boneyards is situated northeast of Cape Naturaliste.

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Tasmania

Do you prefer to surf with a mandatory tow-in? If you head 30km off Cape Raoul, on the southeast coast of Tasmania,  you'll find the iconic Shipstern. Made famous by the legends Tom Carroll and Ross Clarke-Jones, this spot is considered one of the worlds ultimate big wave targets. From the size of the wives through to their stepped formation and prevalence of great white sharks, Shipstern deservedly has the title of one of the most dangerous surf spots on the planet.

Queensland

If you haven't heard of bagging a "Burleigh barrel", it's time to pay attention. Unsurprisingly located in Burleigh Heads on the Gold Coast, this is a must do for anybody that takes surfing seriously. Alternatively, you can drive 45-minute from Surfer’s Paradise to Snapper Rocks, if you're ready to be served up a reliable right-hand point break. Noosa Heads is also a spectacular spot, boasts up to five superb breaks which are collectively regarded as not one of the best longboarding spots in the world. 

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New South Wales

The very first world surfing championships were held respectively at Manly and Bondi in 1964, but as these are super busy beaches, we recommend you head further north to the 6km corridor between Dee Why Beach and North Narrabeen. In the middle of this area is Long Reef bombora, also know as Butterbox. If these dont cut it, you can also head to Lennox Head, near the beautiful Byron Bay, or further north to Duranbah Beach (known as D-bah) to hit up some excellent right and left-hand breaks.

With surf spots along all of the south, east and west coasts, finding the ultimate break isn't a problem, and considering most of the surfing population is anchored to metro areas, it's not too difficult to find an empty break if you are willing to travel.

eriksson-luo-BSXhjfNhZ9M-unsplash

Victoria

Bells Beach on Victoria’s Surf Coast would have to be the spiritual home of surfing in Australia. When it’s pumping, this iconic location attracts massive crowds who eagerly watch the local pros take on moving-mountains of 5m+. However if you just to Winki, only 100m north along the high-cliff coastline where, when the swell is running, you will be rewarded with faster, steeper and more barrelling waves.

You can also head to state's first National Surfing Reserve at Phillip Island, which includes breaks like Woolamai and Magic Lands (it also includes a fair few great white sharks, as a result of the local fur seal population).

Western Australia

If you head 260km south of Perth, you'll arrive at the gateway to Margaret River, which is also known just equally for its proliferation of wineries and surf breaks. Here you'll find breaks that vary from standard fun fare through to full water-walls only designed for the fearless. For the most serious surf, head further south to Prevelly Park and prepare yourself for swells in excess of 6m providing perfect barrels across an offshore reef. Also not a place for beginners is the famous Boneyards, which is considered the 'the best winter break for those crazy enough to take it on'. Boneyards is situated northeast of Cape Naturaliste.

josh-withers-1PWhYZ_erME-unsplash

Tasmania

Do you prefer to surf with a mandatory tow-in? If you head 30km off Cape Raoul, on the southeast coast of Tasmania,  you'll find the iconic Shipstern. Made famous by the legends Tom Carroll and Ross Clarke-Jones, this spot is considered one of the worlds ultimate big wave targets. From the size of the wives through to their stepped formation and prevalence of great white sharks, Shipstern deservedly has the title of one of the most dangerous surf spots on the planet.

Queensland

If you haven't heard of bagging a "Burleigh barrel", it's time to pay attention. Unsurprisingly located in Burleigh Heads on the Gold Coast, this is a must do for anybody that takes surfing seriously. Alternatively, you can drive 45-minute from Surfer’s Paradise to Snapper Rocks, if you're ready to be served up a reliable right-hand point break. Noosa Heads is also a spectacular spot, boasts up to five superb breaks which are collectively regarded as not one of the best longboarding spots in the world. 

josh-withers-93mM11xYb10-unsplash

New South Wales

The very first world surfing championships were held respectively at Manly and Bondi in 1964, but as these are super busy beaches, we recommend you head further north to the 6km corridor between Dee Why Beach and North Narrabeen. In the middle of this area is Long Reef bombora, also know as Butterbox. If these dont cut it, you can also head to Lennox Head, near the beautiful Byron Bay, or further north to Duranbah Beach (known as D-bah) to hit up some excellent right and left-hand breaks.